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  • mauswerkz
    replied
    I have indeed made progress! It's been a while since I've updated this thread. I've been posting more frequent updates on the build thread for the car. Link in my sig below.

    Leave a comment:


  • ALPHA_Moto
    replied
    I have almost zero technical knowledge about EVs (accounting/business student), but I just wanted to give my support. This project is ****in awesome. Keep up the good work man, it truly is inspirational. I'd love to hear an update if you've made any progress as of late?

    Leave a comment:


  • mauswerkz
    replied
    Originally posted by AlexanderB View Post
    I haven't been able to find any data on EV conversions in the UK, and its probably not going to work, because the new rules here state "These technical requirements also apply to import cars." On the other hand, as soon as its legal in the UK, the motor and controller are now "from a roadlegal EV"
    Check here: http://evalbum.com/geo/England

    Find a conversion similar to what you want to do, contact them and ask about the legalities of it in the UK. I'm sure there'd be someone on there willing to help you through that loophole.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlexanderB
    replied
    I guess there is some tricks I can still try. get the part numbers from some 80's EV, print a nice label on the controller box and make a neat alloy plate on a similar sized electric motor.. Pretty bad cheat, but they probably can't prove you did not take it from that roadlegal 80's EV.. (Or, I you actually do find a rusted out 80's EV on the scrapyard, take the real bits, you can always put in a different controller and some extra volts on the pack when its registered. Same with engine swaps, they can't see the difference, nobody cares.)

    The other one is frequently done on homebuilt kitcars, they are shipped to the UK where they have very lax rules about homebuilt and modified cars, and once you have it registered there, you can export it back to your own Euro country and by European law, its streetlegal everywhere in the EU because one of its member states approved. (If you tried to have it registered here, they basically tell you to build 3, and have 2 of them crash-tested.. :? unless its an engine swap, they're okay with that.. Except electric, apparently )

    I haven't been able to find any data on EV conversions in the UK, and its probably not going to work, because the new rules here state "These technical requirements also apply to import cars." On the other hand, as soon as its legal in the UK, the motor and controller are now "from a roadlegal EV"

    Leave a comment:


  • mauswerkz
    replied
    Originally posted by AlexanderB View Post
    Great project. Too bad they changed the rules here, the electric motor and controller both have to be "approved for road use".. So basically, you can now only build an EV if you buy a mega$$$ setup from Siemens or another company that does EV drive trains, or if you find a crashed, previously roadlegal EV and take the motor and controller from it...
    That's a shame. I'm surprised they'd discourage EV conversion like that. I think the US is about the easiest place to do a conversion, with very little oversight or rules regarding it (depending on the state). It's possible in Australia, but you have to convince a government recognized engineer that it's safe in order for it to be legal.

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  • AlexanderB
    replied
    Great project. Too bad they changed the rules here, the electric motor and controller both have to be "approved for road use".. So basically, you can now only build an EV if you buy a mega$$$ setup from Siemens or another company that does EV drive trains, or if you find a crashed, previously roadlegal EV and take the motor and controller from it...

    Leave a comment:


  • Crazy2287
    replied
    Fingers crossed! hoping it doesn't have any gremlins! good work and good luck!

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  • Rosey
    replied
    That's awesome man, best of luck!

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  • mauswerkz
    replied


    New prototype motor controller board has arrived. Assembling and testing it one feature at a time. So far, so good! If all goes well, this board will actually end up in my car.

    Leave a comment:


  • mauswerkz
    replied
    Since this was bumped, I suppose I should post an update! I'm currently on break from Uni, but I've been so busy with other stuff that I haven't had a chance to get much done on this project. Thankfully, I was able to spend some time on it yesterday and (hopefully) have solved one of the problems I was having. The problem was how to charge the massive capacitor in the motor controller before closing the contactor (to avoid an arc between the contacts). This is normally done using a dedicated contactor which connects a resistor across the main contactor so the capacitor can charge gradually. Once the capacitor is charged, the main contactor can close and off you go.

    The issue I was having was that I used relays to do this. It probably wouldn't have been a problem if I didn't want to both charge, and discharge the capacitor, which requires having both the positive and negative connected to the same relay. This means that nearly 400vdc was present the the same relay. Needless to say, I was having arcing issues. So I've designed the piece you see below. It's a solid state circuit which performs the same function. This is just the prototype and will allow me to get the controller running again. The final controller will have this built in, and I'm also planning on making them as stand alone units to sell to the EV community.



    I've also purchased and modified a 3kw industrial variable speed drive so that it can run on my battery pack. This is connected to my second motor and will act to create a load when the first motor is connected to it. This way I can make a dyno for testing and tuning. Very handy to have!

    My motor controller itself is going through a complete redesign at the moment. I wasn't happy with the 3-phase waveform generation algorithm that Atmel wrote and provided in an application note. I had to write my own code to perform dithering on the frequency so that the motor wouldn't jerk when the frequency suddenly jumped by 3-4Hz (due to the use of integer math in the microprocessor). I've written my own algorithm which is capable of up to 0.1Hz (+/- 0.7% of nominal throughout) precision for frequency and 2V precision in voltage. It also set the output duty cycle based on the measured battery voltage so that the output is consistent even when the battery voltage changes. Implementation of frequency control and slip will be much easier because frequency can be set directly as a variable, rather than using a scaled value as the application note did.

    The biggest change though is that I'm moving to a much more powerful microprocessor which will support a ton of features that no other EV motor controller on the market offers and which I think even those of you who aren't in to electric cars will be able to appreciate. More on those once I've made some more progress and have something to show though.

    I'm hoping to have the new hardware design compete and ready to order some PCBs by the end of my Uni break, but that only gives me two weeks to do it and I have other stuff I need to do in that time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Harrstein
    replied
    Bump

    very interested in this project. as in about to do a study of electrical engineering. also quite interested in the battery part as my dad is quite in to this world. he designed batterypacks for electric bikes etc. all Li-ion ofc

    Leave a comment:


  • mauswerkz
    replied
    Originally posted by leadfoot View Post
    mauswerkz i too am a coder proficient in java, c, c++ assembly. i'd be keen to take a look at your code. i'm thinking of starting my own electrical project an integrated car management system. basically a carputer that replaces the ecu radio etc (think r35) the kicker being you'll be able to alter ecu settings on the fly. harnessing the power and calculation speed of a pc. the aim would be to replace the ecu with an interface module that connects to the pc viz usb or sata. i'd also be keen on your input/thoughts. i'm more comfortable with the code side of thing the pcb's aren't my cuppa tea
    Feel free to contact me in PM's on here. I've been planning to put some sort of graphical interface on my system since I started the design. I've got something like the Toyota Prius (or Tesla Model S if I wanted to go really advanced) interface. Something to show and control the main parameters of the drive system. I like the idea of having a computer control the engine of a normal car directly, but I doubt the speed would be there for effective control. I'd be more inclinded to have the computer control the parameters of a dedicated ECU, but have that ECU do the timing-critical work. This also protects against software/hardware crashes on the PC. I would certainly not use Windows. Anyway, we can chat more in IM if you like.

    Leave a comment:


  • leadfoot
    replied
    mauswerkz i too am a coder proficient in java, c, c++ assembly. i'd be keen to take a look at your code. i'm thinking of starting my own electrical project an integrated car management system. basically a carputer that replaces the ecu radio etc (think r35) the kicker being you'll be able to alter ecu settings on the fly. harnessing the power and calculation speed of a pc. the aim would be to replace the ecu with an interface module that connects to the pc viz usb or sata. i'd also be keen on your input/thoughts. i'm more comfortable with the code side of thing the pcb's aren't my cuppa tea

    Leave a comment:


  • mauswerkz
    replied
    Originally posted by Rosey View Post
    28-1-12 last post? We can't have that..

    How's work on the EV-BMW going Mr Maus?
    Battery management system has managed a couple charges now, working fine. The controller is apart at the moment for a redesign of the capacitor precharge circuit. It's slow going at the moment due to Uni and stretching myself very thin with other commitments. It may see anothter surge in progress if thing come together for a solar race car at Uni. If my controller is in a state to be used in such a project, there may be some funding involved. For now though, studies and work take priority :-(

    Leave a comment:


  • Rosey
    replied
    28-1-12 last post? We can't have that..

    How's work on the EV-BMW going Mr Maus?

    Leave a comment:

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