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2008 Suzuki Forenza

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  • 2008 Suzuki Forenza

    So i cleaned my Thrpttle Body is an Eletronic Gen 2 so no cable to deal with. And i Changed my spark plugs to NGK Plats and omg the car is running so well.

    I still have a few problems with the car if anyone can help out let me know please!!!

  • #2
    I'm sure we can; but we'll need to know what the problems are

    Good work on doing your own maintenance so far!

    Comment


    • #3
      So i think i have an exhaust leak but i dont know where it is coming from and the rear rotor on the Passengers side is being a butt and not wanting to come off at all

      Comment


      • #4
        Rotors can get like that; you want a rubber mallet.
        Rubber is softer than steel, so you'll never bend anything smacking it.
        If you can get behind it and soak it with WD40 an hour before you try, it might help too.
        Just remember brake cleaner afterward, if you put a lubricant on it like that.

        As for exhaust leak, all you can do is look for a gap, feel for 'chuffing' air out of joints or buy a cheap vape pen, and blow 'smoke' at the joins until you find the one that 'swirls'.

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        • #5
          You can try to spray soapy water on all "suspicious" exhaust parts (where there is rust or you cant see properly). Then turn on the engine and observe. Leaks will cause air bubbles with the soap. Respray if unsure. Remember, no cold water on hot parts,do it only with a cold engine.

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          • #6
            Good idea.

            No harm spraying cold water on hot parts though; common myth.
            I've never waited for my car to cool down before driving in a sudden downpour.

            And to a more extreme example; I've never seen a red-hot hard working 4x4 stop and cool down before smashing their way through waist deep water.

            There's a reason things on cars are never rigidly mounted

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            • #7
              I am getting a codes too as i have an obdII scanner

              P0705
              P0113
              P2297
              P0132
              P0700

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              • #8
                P0705 - Gearbox error of some type.
                P0700 - Transmission error.

                ^ That's for a dealer to look at; not much you can do there


                P0113 - Air temp sensor error.
                P2297 - o2 sensor out of range
                P0132 - o2 sensor voltage High

                This shows you have a broken o2 sensor, likely caused by the broken Air Temp sensor causing the car to run super rich to protect itself.
                I'm going to guess your fuel economy had dropped significantly.

                So you have 2 sensors to look at, and likely replace.

                And as many plugs, clips, and sensors as possible on the gearbox to unplug, spray with silicone spray, and re-plug.
                Lets hope whatever's going on with the gearbox is just bad connection; because a novice is not fixing their own gearbox electronics.
                Most of the sensors are likely internal.

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                • #9
                  so for the sensor i am getting this from a trusted site i buy my parts from

                  Manufacturers recommend replacing O2 sensors in pairs (both Upstream or both Downstream). An older, slower sensor can cause an imbalance in the engine management system, leading to poor fuel economy and possible damage to the catalytic converter.

                  i am totally lost on what that means.

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                  • #10
                    A lot of cars have 2 sensors; one is pre catalytic converter, and is in charge of telling the ECU how it's running (too rich, too lean, etc).
                    The second is after the catalytic converter, telling the car if it's polluting, and if the cat is doing it's job.
                    Usually the second sensor is 'dumb', Since you have 2 codes, it's likely the first o2 sensor thats busted.

                    But since you have a scan tool, you can actually do the process of elimination.

                    Since you have the tool to reset the codes anyway;
                    Unplug the secondary sensor, go for a short drive, and see if you get NEW codes in addition to what you already have.
                    If you do, there's your answer (that one was working); clear the codes, and replace the faulty one.
                    If no new codes pop up; then unplug the primary one, and see if it makes new codes; you get the idea.

                    Though if it were me, I'd just assume it's the upstream (primary) one, because the catalytic converter tends to keep the secondary one alive a LOT longer.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Master_Scythe View Post
                      Good idea.

                      No harm spraying cold water on hot parts though; common myth.
                      I've never waited for my car to cool down before driving in a sudden downpour.

                      And to a more extreme example; I've never seen a red-hot hard working 4x4 stop and cool down before smashing their way through waist deep water.

                      There's a reason things on cars are never rigidly mounted
                      Good point, I haven't thought about that (even though I already "swam" through rivers in cars). I must admit, the soapy water spray is marginal. I blindly assumed it was because of damages that it got advised to me back in the day. But applying some logic I just realised it must be because the water will evaporate instantly on hot parts and you'd miss the bubbling.

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