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To motorbike, or not to motorbike?

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  • #16
    I once read a really interesting quote saying that you wont know if your the sort of person who rides bikes until you've come off one. wether or not you get back on again determines that. Kinda similar to the whole 'everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face' mantra.

    Yes they are extremely dangerous to ride and those risks are further amplified if you don't wear protective gear (something I'm still guilty of). The only way to get gravel out of your skin is with a wire brush and you'll be in and out of hospital for months receiving skin grafts.

    Having said that riding a bike is extremely fun from something as little as the postie bike I currently ride to the 600cc and up sportsbikes that are essentially road legal race bikes. Riding for me is an expression of individualism, a sense of connection with machine that transcends that of a car (IMO). It's a supreme confidence in yourself and your abilities because you know that one mistake can be the end of you.

    For you riding could be something way simpler like looking like a badass :P You just need to understand the risks involved and if you're ok with them then by all means get a bike and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

    /ramble

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    • #17
      I'd say get yourself a place and a friend with a bike and just SLOWLY try it. Its not to hard. I love riding my bike and this virus infected me just after I tried a 2002 Suzuki SV650s with about 53kW. When thinking about it now, it wasn't the smartest idea to try it with a strong bike.
      However when I started getting my motorcylce license I had about 2 years of driving a manual car (about 50000ks).

      I started riding about 6 month ago, never had any problems or bad situation. And be sure I'm not driving like a pink fluffy angel.

      Originally posted by Rake View Post
      You won't be popping wheelies accidently on a ~250cc.
      I bought myself an old 1984 Honda XL200R. It weighs about 106kg and features a 198cc 1cylinder engine with about 14kW. When I pop the clutch accidently -> great wheelie. So thats a little bit too general I think.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Reece View Post
        I once read a really interesting quote saying that you wont know if your the sort of person who rides bikes until you've come off one. wether or not you get back on again determines that. Kinda similar to the whole 'everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face' mantra.

        Yes they are extremely dangerous to ride and those risks are further amplified if you don't wear protective gear (something I'm still guilty of). The only way to get gravel out of your skin is with a wire brush and you'll be in and out of hospital for months receiving skin grafts.

        Having said that riding a bike is extremely fun from something as little as the postie bike I currently ride to the 600cc and up sportsbikes that are essentially road legal race bikes. Riding for me is an expression of individualism, a sense of connection with machine that transcends that of a car (IMO). It's a supreme confidence in yourself and your abilities because you know that one mistake can be the end of you.

        For you riding could be something way simpler like looking like a badass :P You just need to understand the risks involved and if you're ok with them then by all means get a bike and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

        /ramble
        Great post.

        I've been very fortunate - touchwood - to not have fallen. A little bit of me actually wants to - you know, just to get it over and done with.

        Riding really gives you an appreciation for the road. I kinda wish it was mandatory to ride before you can drive. The quality of people out on the road would increase tenfold.

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        • #19
          I love motos but wouldent ride one on a road I got a yz450f 2006 with new exhust and it is just crazy. It goes so fast and gets there so quick. Its a big scarey bike but Im kinda a speed freack and love any thing that goes fast and the quicker it gets to top end the better

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          • #20
            Hey Celica, i posted a thread like this about 6 months ago and you said it was all dangerous and it doesnt matter if the chicks dig it cos you will be dead. How the tables have turned :P
            sigpic

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Rake View Post
              Great post.

              I've been very fortunate - touchwood - to not have fallen. A little bit of me actually wants to - you know, just to get it over and done with.

              Riding really gives you an appreciation for the road. I kinda wish it was mandatory to ride before you can drive. The quality of people out on the road would increase tenfold.
              Dont fall off, it really messes up your day :/

              I dont wish riding was mandatory, but I wish people had to do a course similar to the bike L's and P's test to get a car licence.
              "Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death" ~ Hunter S. Thompson

              "Lots of power is good, more is better, and too much is perfect. I mean, if less is more, think how much more MORE is..."

              My Ninja ZX10r
              http://forums.mightycarmods.com/show...ki-Ninja-ZX10R
              My Ute
              http://forums.mightycarmods.com/show...-Falcon-XG-ute

              Comment


              • #22
                If you're game, and sensible there's no reason you wouldn't get a bike. I used to have a 96 CBF Hornet(before my father found out and sold it) for driving around Melbourne when I moved out.
                It's the easiest, fastest, cheapest type of vehicle to own and use. Especially compared to my VX.

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                • #23
                  Can someone explain how the L's, P's system works on a bike? Rake has already mentioned the L's course and i understand that but how long do you have to keep your L's for? Is it a matter of hours and a year like a car licence? and same with P's... Really interested in getting my bike licence soon
                  グリニ

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                  • #24
                    I see you're based in Sydney but here's the Vicroads site.
                    http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/Home/...ionLicence.htm

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      L's for three months no hours.
                      P1's for 12 months after an 8 hour course.
                      P2's automatically but I'm not sure how long for.
                      Spelling mistakes are most likely due to me typing on an iPad.
                      MR CELICAS TOY!
                      MrCelicas Family rides!
                      Originally posted by Rake
                      MrCelica is all class. Listen to him.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by MrCelica View Post
                        L's for three months no hours.
                        P1's for 12 months after an 8 hour course.
                        P2's automatically but I'm not sure how long for.
                        P2's are two years, unless you are over 25 then you go straight from P1 to fulls
                        "Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death" ~ Hunter S. Thompson

                        "Lots of power is good, more is better, and too much is perfect. I mean, if less is more, think how much more MORE is..."

                        My Ninja ZX10r
                        http://forums.mightycarmods.com/show...ki-Ninja-ZX10R
                        My Ute
                        http://forums.mightycarmods.com/show...-Falcon-XG-ute

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          In WA if you have your full license already then you get your L's through a computer test and then have your full bike license as soon as you pass the test. I did it three months after my L's when I felt confident after many lessons but you can get it in as long as it takes to book a test so like a month

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                          • #28
                            I know that Green P's only became a thing in NSW in about 2009 after the government caught on that having a full bike licence at 18 years of age is a sin and that noone under 20 should have equal rights as those who are of "mature age".
                            Spelling mistakes are most likely due to me typing on an iPad.
                            MR CELICAS TOY!
                            MrCelicas Family rides!
                            Originally posted by Rake
                            MrCelica is all class. Listen to him.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ArcticVX View Post
                              I see you're based in Sydney but here's the Vicroads site.
                              http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/Home/...ionLicence.htm
                              Originally posted by MrCelica View Post
                              L's for three months no hours.
                              P1's for 12 months after an 8 hour course.
                              P2's automatically but I'm not sure how long for.
                              Originally posted by Snowman View Post
                              P2's are two years, unless you are over 25 then you go straight from P1 to fulls
                              Thanks for the info guys I guess ill be booking a course for the L's whenever I've got the time
                              グリニ

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Not sure if you've worked it out yet or not Greeny, but:

                                L's

                                Minimum Age: 16 years 9 months
                                Minimum Duration: 3 months
                                Expiry: 12 Months

                                You must pass do the Stay Upright course in most cases, and attain a Competancy Certificate. This allows you to do your computer test at the RTA (Exactly like the car one, but with a few extra riding-specific questions). The course spans 2 days at 4 hours each. Bikes and gear are provided for the course. It costs about $80, (government subsidised!)

                                There is no logbook. Once you have your L's you're free to ride, and can go for your P's anytime after 3 months.


                                Red P's

                                Minimum Age: 17 years
                                Minimum Duration: 12 months
                                Expiry: 18 months.

                                It's pretty much exactly like Red P's on a Car. The only difference is the testing. It's a single 8 hour day course + exam. The riding assessment is judged on several, mostly slow speed riding skills. The day costs more, maybe $160 or so but I can't remember. You must provide your own (roadworthy + registered) bike and gear, although some places may allow you to hire their bikes for an additional cost. If you pass, you will receive a certifiacate, you present this to the RTA, pay your licence fee, get a new photo and you're on your way.

                                You will need to practice certain things to give yourself a decent chance of passing. Eg, you need to be able to do a U-turn in, hmm, 20 feet. Some of the tests are actually quite difficult.

                                Green P's

                                Minimum Age: 18 years
                                Minimum Duration: 24 months
                                Expiry: 30 months.

                                Again, pretty much exactly like car Greens. I don't know what test is done, but I imagine it's the same HPT. There's no returning for more day courses once you're advancing to Greens or higher.

                                Green P's can be skipped if you meet certain criteria: Over 25, hold a full Car licence, have held Red P's for 12 months, and have no other restrictions.


                                --

                                The main differences are that:

                                - Bike L's minimum is 3 months, versus Car L's 12.
                                - Bike Learners do not need to be supervised. Infact, they can't be, since you can't carry passengers. You're on your own from the word go!
                                - The day courses mean you must take time off work or school to attend, and there's greater cost involved with getting a bike licence - so it's a double hit. Ultimately there's a lot more hoops to jump through, more bookings, more payments, more places to go to, the process is longer - theres more to it than just a 10 minute multiple choice test, as is the case of a car licence. However, the courses are very good. Easy, but still very good. Makes me wish car drivers had to go through the same.
                                Last edited by Rake; 21-05-2012, 11:55 PM.

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