Super Cheap Auto Castrol Edge Michelin Go Fast Bits Shannons Insurance Haltech Ryobi Century Batteries WD-40 KYB NTK NGK Spark Plugs Whiteline

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

DIY Front Bumper/Air Dam (Yes, really)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Oh
    My
    God

    Some time and motivation has fallen into our laps! Unfortunately we didn't get started until like 1pm but we finally assembled the bloody thing (tentatively) and did some finer shaping work. Getting close to the point where we can use bog/plaster to shape it properly now!











    We actually ended up using the original under-headlight pieces that we made because it turns out they do actually fit... woops... but anyway, we're using them. There's certainly a lot of work to go in shaping, but its extremely satisfying to see it come together!

    Comment


    • #47
      FINALLY! haha looks like its coming along nicely cant wait till its done.
      i asked god for a bike and soon realized god doesnt work that way. so i stole a bike and asked for forgivness,
      the early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
      sex is not the answer, sex is the question, yes is the answer.

      Comment


      • #48
        A bit differently than how i'd have done it... i'd have made it with 1"x4"s cut to shape, strips of resin, bodyworked it till it looked nice, painted it up, coated with release wax, and made a mold for it ;D then you could just vacuum form a sheet of plastic when you need a new front dam. Could sell em too ;D thats how i plan on making replacement fenders when my widebody build finally gets enough funds.

        Comment


        • #49
          We did more work today, shiny, shiny (not really shiny) new work.

          Did some finer-ish shaping on the foam. At some point you have to admit you can't shape the foam any more efficiently and move on. So we did, layered on some gyprock style plaster nice and thick. It's cheap and easy to sand as well as being easy to apply liberally. Just need a good base that we can sand into.



          Next we put on a layer of white finer putty. Didn't dry in time to get to sanding, but this will be our starting point for fine shaping work. Lots of the lines are quite messy and we didn't go all the way out to the edges, but they need some shaping work that we still are working on figuring out the best way to go about it. But we'll get there.









          Soon enough we'll be able to take a female mould off this

          Comment


          • #50
            Great effort very keen to see how this ends!!
            ライジング息子
            sigpic
            知識は力です - LEON

            My STI

            My Old Wagon & Evo IV


            Check My T-Shirts

            Comment


            • #51
              Thanks dude, we're at the pointy end of this now. This is where we either make or break the final product.

              Comment


              • #52
                Not putting anything under the bonnet? Just looks a bit strange, and mightn't be good at speeds (too much air pushing up under the bonnet?)

                Awesome job none the less, looks like a lot of fun/pain/swearing.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Theres already a engine under the bonnet :P

                  I'm going to organise some mesh (most likely security door stuff) to put in the massive opening, Big shiney chrome bumper like the 240/260 look through the middle of it and some indicators on the bottom of the lip but not right along the edge of the road.
                  No pain but definitely alot of swearing and fun

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    awesome work guys. Can't say I'm a fan of the actual look/style you're going for, but damn it if I don't think the effort you're going to isn't absolutely amazing! Keep it up mate!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Sanded back the first two layers and added another. Started to fix up most of the rough spots.

                      Still a lot of work to go. Only one picture since it's not really different from last time except for looking a bit cleaner.



                      Put it on this board for now because as a whole it's not that sturdy, so we found that everytime we moved it the plaster work would crack. We've done a bit of reinforcing with plasterer's tape, but we're still in the market for a more permanent solution.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by popsprocket View Post
                        Sanded back the first two layers and added another. Started to fix up most of the rough spots.

                        Still a lot of work to go. Only one picture since it's not really different from last time except for looking a bit cleaner.



                        Put it on this board for now because as a whole it's not that sturdy, so we found that everytime we moved it the plaster work would crack. We've done a bit of reinforcing with plasterer's tape, but we're still in the market for a more permanent solution.
                        I'd just get the shape right with the plaster, then fiberglass the whole thing. Make sure you use epoxy resin (a lot stronger and easier to manage), but it should hold it all together easily. I wouldn't bother with trying to make the frame too rigid, if you put in enough layers of fiberglass it'll have all the strength you'll need. Although you might still need something structural inside the bumper to prevent warping and bending.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Yeah that's the general idea of where this is headed. If we turn out the first one and there's something wrong then we'll fix up the fiberglass bumper and take a new mould from that (assuming we actually want to bother with a new mould). The only place I really want to look into reinforcing is the lip in the middle between the two corners. I'll have a look when I get there, we might get away with just turning over some edges for some rigidity, but otherwise I might reinforce it with carbon fiber - or if its a serious problem some aluminium strips.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Dude.... Niiice
                            My "show" (wan|<) car:
                            http://forums.mightycarmods.com/show...ing-(Car)Build.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              What's that they're building in there?



                              Well it all began the last time we worked on this. Put another layer of plaster on after sanding the last one a bit and we got more than a little fed up with the minimal progress. Although it was slowly getting better it felt very much like one step forward and one step back. As it turns out, for the middle part of the bumper we were taking less than one step forward with every layer of plaster. We ran some string lines and the results were very depressing. Low spots, high spots, crooked body lines, and to top it all off we noticed that some of the original moulding that we were trusting to be straight wasn't.

                              So we mulled the problem over and went back and forward on ideas until we finally settled on something...


                              *cue eye of the tiger*




                              We sliced it up, saving the end pieces which are coming along pretty nicely, both are only a few touch ups away from being not only symmetrical, but pretty bloody close to as good as they are going to get using plaster.



                              Only a bit more of that left.

                              Which brings us back to the first picture, that frame ended up looking like this:



                              It's a bit gappy because we don't have any measurements to trust and we also changed the angle of the front point too. One of my concerns was that in previous photos the middle spoiler section looked quite flat. Now, despite the gaps which can be filled, the body lines are straight, things line up and match up, it's turned out to be a much better solution (and it only cost us $7 in wood).





                              And just for comparison the old and the new



                              So the new plan is to keep these three pieces separate (the end pieces will have the wheel arch bits added onto them) and produce three separate moulds. With three separate bits we can either bond them together, make it look perfect and take a new mould as a single piece, or we can leave them separate and rivet the middle spoiler onto the rest for that race prepared look.

                              progress, like a bawss
                              Last edited by popsprocket; 10-02-2012, 04:49 PM.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Just a quick update. It'll be time to move to using bog soon, the plaster isn't suitable for fine shaping because of how soft it is.



                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X