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Jenga's Project Yaris

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  • MHR1294
    replied
    Brilliant,

    So the intercooler there, is that running it's own coolant circuit I assume? I guess that's fixed now that you've managed to up the boost?

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  • Jenga
    replied
    Since upping the boost, I've had a few issues with popping hoses... It would happen about once a week. Yes, I know that pipe isn't rolled, so it's a miracle it's even held at 24psi.



    I've been meaning to tidy up the intake piping for some extra stock looking-ness, so I spent a few hours and installed some new piping.





    Looking good

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  • Marty
    replied
    This is excellent!

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  • MHR1294
    replied
    You know, there's jokes about Marty and Moog building a Yaris and they say they will do it.

    100% you should duel them with this!

    I tried getting RE003 here in the UK but they're so soft they're banned for road use, so I have RE030 instead

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  • Jenga
    replied
    Yep, still around. The only changes since the last post are that the boost was wound up to 24psi, I installed a new set of injectors (850cc Siemens) so I have the option of going to E85 and it has a new set of RE003's. Traction is an issue, haha.

    It's all just worked and continued to work, quite amazing for a project car. I want to have it retuned to run E85, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.
    Last edited by Jenga; 30-04-2019, 05:22 AM.

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  • kin37ik
    replied
    you still around and working on this jenga?

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  • MHR1294
    replied
    Even at 170hp I bet that thing goes like a rocket, they don't weigh anything!

    Less joins the better! My friend spent a whole day tightening up clamps on his evo...

    That's a good service from Haltech, did they tell you what caused your first one to die though? Wish I could afford to get a Haltech - the usual I'm spending all my money on importing a car instead.

    It's good that you're doing it over a long period of time, like you said, sorting all the minor issues out. there's nothing worse than modifying a car and then having it go bang.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jenga
    replied
    Update time again!

    The next part was to get the intercooler piping sorted... Using a WTA intercooler made piping SO much neater - 4 joints total and some fairly simple routing.






    Next was to get the Haltech sorted - I wanted it to be plug and play. I actually ran this with the stock motor for a while (staged testing - change one thing at a time where possible). I had an issue where the ECU died, Haltech sent me a brand new one. Their service is awesome, I'd have no hesitation buying another one in future.




    Once the fuel system and haltech were tested on the stock motor, the time came to swap in the turbo motor. I took a week off work to swap it all in... I'll let the pictures do the talking:













    Everything went pretty smoothly - exactly what I'd planned. I went for a stealth exhaust tip too..




    The turbo is tucked away pretty neatly.






    After the engine was in, I decided to do some basic road tuning and drive it around for a few weeks, to run the engine in (and make sure I caught all the bugs).

    Fortunately I have a wife who's good at helping with road tuning




    Once the issues were all ironed out, it was off to be tuned... This is what happened:



    So, it made 170hp @ 17psi. Not the number I was hoping for, but a weak wastegate spring and a insufficient intercooler (needed a better radiator) were preventing it from going any furthur. Corey (the tuner) thinks it'll be capable of ~24psi before the turbo runs out of puff. That sort of boost should happily get me to the ~230hp mark.

    Needless to say, have a look at that power curve, the turbo is savage. Put your foot down and hang on.... Peak torque at 4,300rpm and peak power at 5800rpm. Extremely useable power, the turbo size is excellent. Not too laggy and tonnes of top-end. Traction is an issue. I'm planning on taking it back to Corey for a final tune sometime in the next few months.

    I replaced the wastegate spring and it holds 20psi all the way to redline (so let's assume it's making ~200hp at the moment)... I'm seriously considering if it needs any more power. It is seriously fun to drive.

    I've been driving it for about 3 months so far, a few minor issues that I'm sorting out one-by-one.

    More updates to come
    Last edited by Jenga; 20-08-2018, 09:16 AM.

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  • TheCaptain
    replied
    Oh my, great work Jenga, that is amazing. I love reading your posts

    Welds on the exhaust look pretty solid to!

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  • Jenga
    replied
    The good thing about using a 'dummy' car was that I could manufacture all the piping and ensure it was going to fit, before putting it in the daily Yaris.

    So yeah, I made a exhaust. I got a bottle of gas the MIG this time around and had some guidance (via text messages, LOL) from a friend of mine who knows far more about welding than I do. I enjoyed making it, but I'm glad I don't make them for a job. It's hard to get right.






    I discovered that the throttle body from a Corolla would bolt straight on. They're cheap(ish) and easy to get. The 1NZ-FE TB was tiny, so let's assume it's a worthwhile upgrade :P




    I wanted stealth for this build, and that meant avoiding obvious 'performance car' things. I opted to go for a water to air intercooler, it fitted perfectly in the spot where the original airbox sat. Quite a elegant solution. I even reused the spare washer bottle as a resovoir, for super stealthiness.








    Of course the fuel system was next. I went for a normal return-type system (the standard Yaris is returnless). So that meant tapping a return bung in the fuel rail, running a return line, installing a FPR and upgrading the fuel pump. I did this part in the black Yaris because as long as the pressure remains the same, the stock ECU shouldn't care. It allowed me to put some hours on the new fuel system.











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  • Jenga
    replied
    The flywheel and clutch went on without any issues (no pics sorry - it was a stupidly hot day. When it's 36 degrees in your garage, you forget these things).



    As mentioned before, the new engine was getting installed in the written-off Yaris for test fitting, wiring, exhaust, intercooler and general checks.




    Then this happened. As much as I wanted to go with the megasquirt, I couldn't afford the time. Plus I wanted to use the DBW throttle and all the goodies that the Elite ECUs offered. I purchased the ECU from someone who was running it on their jet ski. I couldn't really justify the brand-new price of one, however that quickly changed. These things are well worth the money you pay for them.



    I ended up removing the plug from the spare Yaris ECU and made a converter loom (this was the first version - excuse the messy wires). I got the engine up any running and it didn't blow up!





    Of course because the written-off Yaris was a automatic car, I needed to bypass the good old Park/Neutral switch.



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  • Jenga
    replied
    The fun continues...

    The rest of the engine went back together without incident. Lots of little bits and pieces were done, oil feed and drain, water feed, checking clearances, etc...

    [

    Next was the gearbox and LSD install. Anyone who's worked on a Yaris gearbox knows that getting 5th gear removed is a absolute turd... I used a combination of gear pullers to get it done. I'll upload some pics of it in a future post.





    Of course the new LSD didn't come with bearings (and toyota said it'd take ~3 weeks to get new ones), so I had to remove the originals. I hate removing gearbox bearings.





    And it all went back together...




    I also got a rear swaybar too, it went on the black yaris of course.





    From here, the engine install is staged. Because I have to drive this thing to work each day, I need to test as many parts as possible, before they go in to the black Yaris.

    The stages were:
    - Put the new clutch on, install the gearbox
    - Install the new engine in the white chassis
    - Run the new engine on a stock ECU (with the original injectors) and hope that nothing blows up
    - Finish the aftermarket ECU
    - Get the aftermarket ECU running on the black yaris, make a custom wiring loom
    - Install the new fuel system and a return line on the black yaris
    - Road tune the black yaris
    - Finish the intercooler setup
    - Then over a 3-5 day period, transplant the engine from the white yaris to the black one
    - Another road tune to test everything
    - Professional tune
    ​​​​​​​- Fun
    Last edited by Jenga; 11-05-2018, 05:27 AM.

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  • Jenga
    replied
    Update time. A lot has happened in the last few months. Thank goodness I didn't use photobucket, everything would have been lost...

    Back around Chirstmas, the last of the gaskets and bearings arrived, so I could start reassembling the block. The first trick I ran in to was the width of the new rods - they're so wide they hit on the side of the block! Because the 1NZ-FE crank is offset (gives it more power on the exhaust stroke apparently), a notch had to be ground out, using a die grinder.

    I used factory main bearings, turns out they can be replaced without any tools. A number is stamped on the crank and one on the block (one number for each bearing). You add the two numbers together and order that bearing from Toyota. How good is that.

    Beyond that, the bottom end went together without incident. The top end, however, was another story.







    Next job was the new valve springs - A $25 ebay valve compressor tool and a couple of hours, the job was done.




    The ARP valve studs went in, they were a challenge. They have to be hand-tightened, so the threads in the block must be super clean. I had an impossible time finding a tap that was long enough, so I improvised and used a factory head bolt and put it in and out of the block a bunch of times, cleaning it each time. It worked pretty well.




    Then the head went on, all seemed well... I put the cams in, but had a issue with one sitting properly. I quickly discovered that the head stud was impacting on the disc next to the cam position sensor. I pulled it all apart again, ground the stud down (yay die grinder) and put it all back together. That took quite a few hours, because the head had to be thoroughly cleaned again.






    The next fun item was the VVT oil valve... Because the head studs (and nuts) are so much longer, it gets in the way of the oil passage for the control valve, meaning the valve won't go all the way in. After a bit of cursing, head scratching and researching, I came to the conclusion that I could die grind a portion off the end of the valve, without impacting the way it works.

    I'm dissapointed I had these issues with the ARP studs. I was hoping I'd simply purchased the non-VVTi studs and I missed a warning on their website. But nope. No warning or anything.






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  • TheCaptain
    replied
    Also might have something to do with the fact I just became a moderator, not sure. I hope users can reply in here aswell, would help with the activity.

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  • Jenga
    replied
    Hey hey, people can post replies in build threads again!

    Lots has been happening, I'll post a proper update soon. The long and the short is it's a few weeks from going to the tuner

    Originally posted by Marty View Post
    how'd you go with the machinist in terms of getting them to do what you wanted. It seems often they are so 'specialist' that they'll often only deal with workshops rather than backyarders
    It's all word of mouth and when you do find someone who's happy to work with a DIYer, there's a unspoken code that says you can only refer others who know what they're doing, rather than posting it on the internet. I might be wrong. The guy I went though honed the cylinders, balanced everything, set the ring gaps and machined the flywheel. He did a great job and was happy to do as little or as much as I wanted.
    Last edited by Jenga; 21-03-2018, 05:27 AM.

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