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1996 Geo Metro Lsi

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  • 1996 Geo Metro Lsi

    So this is my 1996 Geo Metro Lsi. It has a 4 cylinder G13BA SOHC engine and a 3 speed Automatic transmission, basically bone stock. It has very little rust which is rare with this car but a good thing for me. Future plans are to rebuild the engine, weld in a roll cage eventually and upgrade the shocks and struts. Far off plans are to upgrade the G13B block to a DOHC and replace everything I need to replace to get it to run. Here is a recent picture of my car.



    As you can see I have the engine out. I took it apart while it was still in the engine bay and then when I had everything out except the crankshaft, I took a tow strap, wrapped it around the block twice and after taking the bolts out that held the block to the transmission, I got on the bumper and lifted it right out.


  • #2
    This is what my engine looked like before I took it completely apart.



    This was when I was checking to see if the timing belt had jumped a tooth to cause the ungodly sound that I was hearing. It hadn't and everything was still in time.



    To get to this point I took the head bolts out, the timing belt off and removed my catalytic converter as well as multiple connections related to fuel delivery, throttle position, fuel ratio, etc. so that I could pull the head with both the intake and exhaust manifold still attached.





    This was my view of the block after pulling the head.



    After taking the pistons out.

    The original picture I posted to start this thread was taken after pulling the block as you see it out.



    Here is one of the pistons I pulled. After talking with one of the teachers of my auto tech classes and showing him the piston he told me that I could probably, based off of the wear he saw, put new rings on and put it back in. I am still going to take the block and head with me to school in the fall to test all the surfaces for trueness before I start putting the block back together.

    I suspected after an initial look at the block and head that the head was most likely the cause of the problem. (Backstory) I was pulling out of a parking lot when all of a sudden it sounded like metal was clanging in my engine. My car started sputtering but when I would get to about 30 MPH it would kind of even out and act a lot better but there was still a lot of clanging. I was able to get the car into my driveway and turn it off and thus started the rebuild project. There wasn't any oil leaking and when I checked the oil there wasn't any fairy dust.

    I suspect the head because as I was turning it with a wrench it would spin just fine then jump substantially forward the way I was turning it and stop. This engine is known for hydraulic lifter issues and so I am going to rebuild it completely as well.



    This is the block on my bench. I was able to take the flywheel off but with some difficulty. My next task was to take the timing gear sprocket off at the other end and I had to use everything I had to "crack" the bolt.









    So to beat this demon bolt (Not pictured but would have been in the middle of the sprocket pictured in the 1st photo of these recent 4) I took a prybar, stuck it underneath a board I had screwed to the wall (It was for some other storage project) put it in between two of the flywheel bolts and used the timing belt to wedge the sprocket so that it wouldn't move. I tried my best to use the tow strap to keep the block on the bench as I used a cheater bar and a 6 foot tall pvc pipe to "crack" the bolt loose.

    After taking the sprocket off I wrestled the bearing cap bolts loose with the help of my brother who held the block down. I then took the oil pump off and was able to take the crankshaft out.

    Here are the torque specifications that I will be using to put this 4 cylinder back together.



    And here is what my bench looks like with most of the parts I took off.

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    • #3
      Hey, I got one of those.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Monsieur_Rob View Post
        Hey, I got one of those.
        The engine or the car?

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        • #5
          Both. But mine is a 1998 5-speed manual.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Monsieur_Rob View Post
            Both. But mine is a 1998 5-speed manual.
            So you have coil packs instead of a distributor, and yours is rebadged as a Chevy. These little cars are getting rarer by the day and so far I have only seen about 4 around my town besides mine but only 3 were hatchbacks.

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            • #7
              No, mine has the original Suzuki badge, because I live in Europe.

              Also distributor. But if the Chevys have coil packs I might go have a gander at parts for them.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Monsieur_Rob View Post
                No, mine has the original Suzuki badge, because I live in Europe.

                Also distributor. But if the Chevys have coil packs I might go have a gander at parts for them.
                Oh so you have a suzuki swift? Here in the U.S after 96 Chevy changed the Geo brand back to Chevy and instead of metros being sold as Geo Metros they were sold as Chevy Metros. I think it had something to do with Suzuki's partnership with Chevy coming to an end because Suzuki was allowing their Suzuki Swift platform to be used by Chevrolet as well as their Suzuki Sidekick platform which is why both the Trackers and the Metros still use suzuki parts. I even contacted GM about my Metro and they told me to contact Suzuki for any questions concerning my Metro.

                Here is a 98 Metro with coilpacks:

                Image result for 98 geo metro engine

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                • #9
                  Well, that doesn't look much like the engine bay on mine. It still has the big air filter on top and the plugs at an angle.

                  Also mine doesn't have AC so it just had a blanking plate in the front slot on the right. Pretty practical, you just had to remove the plate to make the engine bay cool down during the hot summers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Monsieur_Rob View Post
                    Well, that doesn't look much like the engine bay on mine. It still has the big air filter on top and the plugs at an angle.

                    Also mine doesn't have AC so it just had a blanking plate in the front slot on the right. Pretty practical, you just had to remove the plate to make the engine bay cool down during the hot summers.
                    My car still has spark plugs and a distributor. The spark plugs come in at an angle but I am fortunate to have AC, except I don't use the AC because it robs my car of the little power it already makes and slows my car down. The cooling system is very efficient and so I don't have to worry about blocking and unblocking anything.

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