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2013 Veloster turbo.

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  • 2013 Veloster turbo.

    I intend to keep the external pretty stock, first step was going from the rather silly 215/40/R18 tyres to 225/40/R18 which are about 30% cheaper per tyre. Just before that I had the wheels refurbished.



    Wheels as they came, got them refurbished.





    I've had the steering wheel re-wrapped:



    I took the doorcards off to repair the speak dust covers to fix the annoying rattle:



    I had to replace the rear camera as it came out looking like this:



    There was salt water on the CMOS sensor!

    Had a major workout removing the screen's plastic surround (I had to use both arms and leverage to get it to unclip) and wired up a new android head unit:



    So now I can run apps directly on the screen like waze and torque:



    This was the stock engine bay:



    I had a rear brace and metal fuel line installed first then I installed the intake and front brace:



    Then I installed a dual catch can:



    This is the current tune:



    The 3rd run is a bit wonky because of this:



    So now it is running HKS spark plugs that I installed.

    The next phase should start when restrictions start easing up over here.

  • #2
    Get NGK next time, HKS has a history in nissan world of being a little hit and miss.

    What the deal with these cars anyway?
    Are there turbo upgrades? What can they get to without extra supporting mods (like injectors and pump).
    Does the stock turbo flow much more before becoming a heat-pump?

    Ive always liked them, but there's a lot of talk of them being built to a very hairline tolerance.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Master_Scythe View Post
      Get NGK next time, HKS has a history in nissan world of being a little hit and miss.

      What the deal with these cars anyway?
      Are there turbo upgrades? What can they get to without extra supporting mods (like injectors and pump).
      Does the stock turbo flow much more before becoming a heat-pump?

      Ive always liked them, but there's a lot of talk of them being built to a very hairline tolerance.

      Yes you can get a stuffed turbo in the same housing for 70-80 extra BHP, the thing you have to worry about is actually engine, especially on the earlier ones the rods can only go up to about what I'm at, the later revisions are ok up to about 300BHP from the factory, the stock turbo has about 20-30BHP left in it for supporting mods.

      Keeping the above in mind I am getting the engine rebuilt with new rods, pistons, bearings and head studs and springs and getting it ported.

      I'll be moving from a 9.5:1 compression ratio to the new piston design in the 2020 turbos of 10:1.

      I'll gain a little bit more with the higher compression ratio than some others I hope.

      To go with that I have an FMIC, BOV, BOV solenoid, catted high flow downpipe and borla touring catback exhaust.

      Next things I'll be looking at once that is all sorted:

      Brake kit
      Re-enforced clutch
      Limited slip diff
      Stuffed turbo

      They are the main things, the brakes are not bad for the moment but that and clutch I would want to do before the turbo and the limited slip diff would certainly help put it down.
      Last edited by Meaker; 29-04-2020, 10:13 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        A bit of advice I learned the hard way; Do the mods, before the engine, and see if it holds, because it's being 'rebuilt' anyway.
        There's been more than once where I've done an engine build BEFORE the mods, without realizing the logic that the car is going to be off the road for the same time anyway! blown, or healthy, it still needs to come out and be worked over.

        At least it's rods, and not pistons. You can EASILY tune around weak rods by making sure boost comes on a little later.
        350Z's and such also had pencil thin rods, so you just need to taper the boost VERY slowly into to.

        It makes sense that rods bend though, if people are re-coring the stock housing.
        You'll have the same fast spooling hot side, and a bigger compressor, which will make more boost sooner.
        If you clip the hot side turbine, so it comes on a little later, you'll probably be laughing.

        A lot fo the old custom turbo tricks like that have been forgotten in the new 'bolt it on, zero effort please' sort of world.


        EDIT: You might want to have a polite word to your tuner also.... That dyno shows there's an issue quite early on, yet the graph continues for the entire revv range..... Why didnt he pull out? Bizarre.
        Last edited by Master_Scythe; 30-04-2020, 04:04 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          The power curve is from a dyno day so they were just getting people on there, doing three runs and getting them away. It was not during the tune.

          If the rods go it will destroy the lower block of the engine so i'll need a new engine too. Their limits are well tested, any more pressure and they go, that's why Hyndai actually uprated it a couple of years into the run with 50% thicker rods.

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh you intend to use the old block. Fair enough.
            What does Hyundai charge for a bare or short block?

            Still, my point about boosting slower still will save weak rods.
            While I could quote tons of personal experience, the best example you can look up is 'Yaris Hilton'; they just advanced the timing to hell for lols.
            If they hadn't pushed Scotty to go that little bit more, she wouldn't have popped. Those corolla engines are literally finger thick rods; but the turbo didn't start making good boost until about 3k.

            There's COUNTLESS stories of engines losing wastegate lines and boosting to, say 30PSI, and people wonder 'why didn't it blow??!' partly luck, but mostly, that the extra boost came at a revv range where the cylinders dont see it much.

            All the extra pressure moves the piston, and near instantly the exhaust valves are open.

            Comment


            • #7
              This turbo is quite broad in this one, 1500-5000rpm is the optimal range for it.

              Comment


              • #8
                And thats why it breaks rods, even WRX's TD04's don't come on till 1800RPM.
                If you clip the rear side, when you recore to a larger one, the rods would probably be OK for a long time.
                You want to see near zero boost below 2k.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'd rather have the increased responsiveness even for the cost. I don't want to sacrifice the on the road performance.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Meaker View Post
                    I'd rather have the increased responsiveness even for the cost. I don't want to sacrifice the on the road performance.
                    Fair enough too.

                    Engine builds in Australia are about $10k minimum including labour, if you expect an out-and-in job; It's just cultural You'd be hard pressed to find someone who wants to drop 10k (plus boltons) on a Hyundai, when it could be $0 (plus boltons).

                    I'm not ragging on the car, I like them, as I said, it's just you'd be hard pressed to find the people with $10k of passion for them over here, haha.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In this country the veloster (especially the turbo) is quite rare and the turbo even more so (about 250 cars IIRC). They are not huge demand so I was able to basically swap my 1.0 litre turbo I20 for it. It needed some work but I have done as much of it as I can.

                      The labour cost here is pretty reasonable (It's not cheap work of course) but there is a healthy custom engine community, they are more used to working on more classic motors but that's not a big issue.

                      Also I get it serviced at my local dealer, they have been very supportive and the engineers have liked some of things I have had done so far (the steering wheel is most popular). I get a good rate from them and repairs/service have been very reasonable. They even took me under the car to show me a couple of bits.

                      So I get to be a bit different on a car that while parts are not immediately available they are out there if needed.

                      I do intend to go a bit further over the next couple of years but i'll try and stay true to the original concept of the car

                      This round of parts (FMIC, downpipe, exhaust, engine and labour) is looking to be around $11,000 AUS.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just a little thing but I was stupid and left my car unlocked last week and someone had a good rummage. One of the things they broke (fortunately it was the most annoying) was the external GPS receiver on my head unit. Forced me to look up if I could adapt the one that came in my car (since it had originally) and sure enough it can be:



                        And now my Satnav (waze) is really accurate

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Meaker View Post
                          Just a little thing but I was stupid and left my car unlocked last week and someone had a good rummage. One of the things they broke (fortunately it was the most annoying) was the external GPS receiver on my head unit. Forced me to look up if I could adapt the one that came in my car (since it had originally) and sure enough it can be:



                          And now my Satnav (waze) is really accurate
                          I love Waze, having it on my aftermarket head unit has saved me from a speeding ticket on numerous occasions

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by OSP00L View Post

                            I love Waze, having it on my aftermarket head unit has saved me from a speeding ticket on numerous occasions
                            Yep, it's very nice. In my I20 the inbuilt system had camera notification built in (when connected to the net) which was crazy.

                            New delivery:

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Meaker View Post

                              Yep, it's very nice. In my I20 the inbuilt system had camera notification built in (when connected to the net) which was crazy.

                              New delivery:

                              I love super pro stuff, ran a whole set in one of my old cars

                              Comment

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